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Ji Xing in Song Gobing¡¯s Xin Yi Quan PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 04 June 2007
Ji Xing in Song Gobing’s Xin Yi Quan
Ji Xun Shi(the rooster searches for food)
    (1). Pan Fa(convolving method)
    Stand naturally with your feet and heels separated in a width of your shoulders. Your feet should be kept nearly in a line. Keep your hands drooped beside your legs. Then you step forward with your right foot, bend your knees, squat down and strike your opponent with your hands cleaving downward passing the fight side of your body. Your fight crus and thigh should be formed an angle about 100 degrees. Slightly turn your fight tiptoe inwar6 Make your left foot followed it and stepped forward behind the arch of your fight foot. Your left tiptoe should be pointed to the arch of your fight foot keeping a certain distance of one foot around between them. Your legs should be closed inward. Your feet should be kept in an irregular pose of Ding Zi Bu(a pacing pose like a character T in Chinese lettering ) as the picture shows. Step your right foot straight ahead while your left one is tamed inward at an angle of around 60 degrees with its tiptoe pointing to the arch of your right foot. Strike your opponent with your left hand cleaving downward outside your right knee with your fingers apart fromm each other and the center of your fight palm leftward. Raise your brain bone behind your head, slightly shrink your mandible, keep your tongue touching your palate, and slightly dose the upper part and the lower of your teeth The San Guan (three passes the internal Qi must pass through when it moves inside around your body) can be easily got through. The Qi (your breath and interior strength) can reach Ni Wan (an acupoint on the upper part of your body called day bolus in Chinese meaning) on your top body and Yong Quan (the acupoints beneath your soles called bubbling spring in Chinese meaning). You can improve your health and prolong your lifespan by practicing it well. Your heels and toes should be kept grasping the ground. Make sure you do not raise your heels. In Pangbu (a city in Anhui Province, China) school of Xin Yi (minding and intending) Liu He (six harmonies) Quan (boxing), some masters especially emphasize the idea that their disciples must neither raise their toes nor their heels apart from the ground at all costs. It is named the Quan of real Kung-fu only depending on one's hard practicing, if you touch the ground with your toes but raise your heels, you would be practicing without any effect. This fixed form of Kung-fu is called Ji Xun Shi. The style with the right foot ahead is You Shi (right style) Ji Xun Shi. Picture (1) shows the said movement.  Following the above-mentioned style, keep your feet still, raise your hands in front of your chest, slightly raise your body, then make a step forward and leftward with your left foot, bend your knees and squat down, strike your opponent with your hands cleaving downward passing the left side of your body. Your left crus and thigh should be formed an angle of about 100 degrees. You should slightly turn your left tiptoe inward. Your right foot should be followed and stepped forward behind the arch of your left foot. Your fight tiptoe should be pointed to the arch of your left foot keeping a certain distance of one foot around between them. Your legs should be closed inward. Your feet should be kept in an irregular pose of Ding Zi Bu as the picture shows. Step your left foot straight ahead while your right foot is turned inward at an angle of around 60 degrees with its tiptoe pointing to the arch of your left foot Strike your opponent with your right hand cleaving downward outside your left knee with its fingers apart from each other and the center of the palm leftward. Then strike him with your left hand cleaving downward outside your left buttock with its fingers apart from each other and the center of the palm facing the buttock. Raise your brain bone behind your head, slightly shrink your mandible, look forward, keep your tongue touching your palate and slightly close me upper part and me lower of your teeth. Your heels and ten toes should be grasped the ground. Make sane you do not raise your heels. This fixed style with the left foot ahead is the Zuo Shi (left style) Ji Xun Shi. You should repeatedly practice the movement from the right to left, from forward to backward stepping in a straight line.
    (2). Jin Yi (intention of your strength):
The six forms of Xin Yi Quan include: Ji Tui (rooster leg), Long Shen (dragon body), Xiong (bear shoulders), Ying Zhuo (eagle clawing), Hu Bao Tou (tiger's head held in the arms) and Lei Sheng (thunder). They are also said to be six arts. Ji Tui is the primary form of those six. The beginners Xin Yi Quan have to learn Ji Xun Shi well first in founding a solid base of Zhuang Gong (the pegging Kung-fu training) in prancing Xin Yi Quan. There are three Jin Ji with Ji Xun Shi in prancing
     ( a ) Your front foot and leg should be slightly straight. The tiptoe of your back foot should be pointed to the arch of your front one. Your legs should be closed inward. Bend your knees and make your body the lower the better. The perfect angle formed by your cruses and thighs should be of 90 degrees. You should grasp the ground with both your heels and toes while the arches of your feet are being in the air. Your Qi should be sunk down passing through your acupoints of Yong Quan into the ground. The ground is the origin of everything on earth. Practicing it well, you can feel that your strength would be deeply rooted in the ground with your Zhuang Gong quite remarkable. If you practice it frequently, you can be free in advancing or retreating, turning sideways or inward with your legs and feet full of power.
     (b) Taking the Zuo Shi Ji Xun Shi for example, you strike your opponent with your hands cleaving down and screw arms with your hands passing your body on your left side. There is a kind of Ning Guo (screwing and wrapping) strength. You should turn your body leftward and make your right shoulder ahead. The tip of your nose, the tips of your arms and your tiptoe should be kept in a line forming a kind of strength of Ning Guo as well as the strength of holding, crashing, wrapping and Stirrings up.
     (c) You should practice Ji Xun Shi from the right style to the left one, and repeatedly practice stepping from backward to forward. There is a Jin Ji of Cai Pu (trampling and pouncing) and Zhan Fan (holding and overturning).
    (3). Purpose:
      (a) Suppose my opponent tries to hit me in front of my face with his left fist attacking straight ahead, I can bend my knees and squat down. Then I apply Zuo Shi Ji Xun Shi, shun his straight hitting, step forward with my right foot and stir up sidelong with my right hand towards his right side. That's the Tiao Ling Shi (stirring up and leading style).
      ( b ) Suppose my opponent tries to hit me in front of my face with his left fist attacking straight ahead, I can bend my knees and squat down. Then I apply Zuo Shi Ji Xun Shi, shun his straight hitting, step forward with my right foot, and strike his chest directly with my right elbow. That's the Kung-fu of Ding Zhou(elbow striking).
                               
 
 

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